That’s German Quality For You

Another dark and dreary January day arrived, and when I pulled up at office, I once again had to carefully walk over that frozen mess that’s been building-up in the area where I park. At least the City workers were out front getting those snowbanks taken away, and for some reason, they’ve been very lax in keeping those scooped-up and hauled away. Now that our reliable “Bob” is fully retired, I doubt the one who’s taken his place, will be able to fully fill his shoes. I’m truly going to miss him, along with always find it sad when seeing the good ones retiring early, and the ones you wish would go sailing into the sunset, hanging on for no reason other than they can. If I were steering the boat, I’d be offering a few golden parachutes just to get rid of them, and if they wouldn’t take it, I’d find a way to force them out.

After playing catch-up with recent happenings from one of my colleagues this morning, I headed out to a home I have listed to meet a crew from Affordable’s, where they were to pick up a large amount of furnishings that’d been readied for pick-up. They were late getting there, and not but a few minutes after standing there, I decided to pitch right in to help them load, and only because I would’ve likely been there all day.

Unfortunately, there was more there than their truck would hold, so I followed them back to their warehouse and helped them get it unloaded, just to keep things moving, and of course I certainly didn’t want to be standing at that home waiting for their return. It didn’t take them long to realize I’m a pretty good physical worker when need be.

When we got back to get the rest of it, I made sure they put all the furniture that was remaining, in their truck first, and then we placed the mattress and box springs atop it, just so that very heavy mirror and four large pieces of glass would make the ride back without getting broken.

The only hiccup we had, was the inability of those other two guys to get a sofa up from the basement, in spite of my helping them on one end of it, so after they left, I called a friend of mine who had just taken his lunch break, and more than willing to help me get it out. After all that struggling with those other two, it only took about ten minutes for the two of us to get it up and out. Each time I watch people lifting boxes and furniture, I almost always notice they’re not handling heavy things in a proper way. More than once I had to basically tell those two how to lift some of those heavier items, just so they wouldn’t hurt themselves. For some reason, people just don’t realize they have far more strength in their legs, than they have in their arms, so why don’t they put them to a better and safer use?

It was shortly after the lunch hour by the time I arrived back at office, and while gone, the selling agent of that particular home, called to ask if they could do their walk-thru this coming Thursday, which made me all the happier we had everything out of the house and garage. I know we were cutting it close, but as always, we had to rely on the schedules of others, and with the holidays in the mix of it, created an even shorter window of time to get it fully vacant.

With no pressing appointments this afternoon, I went back on the attack of getting my tax information sorted-out and readied for my tax person. There was only about two hours spent on it, which was enough for one day, so I decided to find something else to poke my head into.

A very many years ago, I had a listing of an estate, and after the out-of-State beneficiaries had it all cleaned out, I went back over to make sure it was presentable for showings, and of course it needed some touch-ups, and while sweeping down cobwebs in the rafters and box sills, something dark just happened to catch my eye, so I reached up and pulled out two very long and exceptionally sharp butchering knives which must’ve been there for decades. Well, after they’d been in my storage room for far too long, I took them out and began cleaning them this afternoon with some soft steel wool. The one that was the sharpest, happened to have a German manufacture’s stamp on the blade which read, “J.A. Henckels” along with the name of the city, so curious me, went to my computer to look it up.

It didn’t take me long to find the company because it’s still in existence, but it’s now called Zwilling which means “twin” in German. Since there was a Wikipedia page on the company, I read the whole story about that top-drawer cutlery company which has been in existence since 1731, and claim to be one of our world’s oldest companies in existence.

Over those many years, they’ve branched-out, bought out some other companies, added more brands, along with expanding on their line of products, which prompted me to go to their website, along with looking to see if there were any for sale on Ebay. Not to my surprise, they’re noticeably more expensive, but judging by the condition of the one I was cleaning today, they’re made to last. The blades on the ones I found, are well over a foot and half long, which tells me they were possibly used in the old Decker’s slaughterhouse which was one monster build-out for its time. I never knew what the previous owner’s did for a living, but I wouldn’t be surprised if perhaps the husband kept the both of them after he retired from Decker’s, just for old times sake. If you check on Ebay to see their prices, look at the most expensive Zwilling kitchen knife which is selling for over two thousand dollars. Their quality must be in the top ten percent of fine cutlery, but of course, that’s German quality for you. If I can get mine cleaned up and polished to near-perfection, I’ll have to take a photo of it and share with all of you.

Tonight’s One-liner is: A person who won’t read, has no advantage over one who can’t.

Joe Chodur

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