Vocations

Have any of you really noticed at times how people work at their jobs as well as the quality of their work? Also, have you noticed how some people who are in customer service really aren’t cut out to be servants of customers? Having been in supervisory positions in past years, I found myself attempting to re-educate workers in how they should perceive the hours they spend at work. More than once I found myself being quite hard with some of them when I found them slacking off. I re-iterated to them that they agreed to perform given tasks with the best of their abilities for a set hourly rate. I believed and still believe that if a person doesn’t give their best when doing their jobs, then the employer is basically getting cheated when pay check time rolls around. It is a two way street. Perhaps this is why so many companies and agencies take that “us against them” mentality when dealing with day to day problems.

Corporate narcissistic attitudes are creating a backlash of indifference and alienation. I remember reading an article some years ago which spoke about how companies in Germany feel about their employee/employer relationships. The thrust of that article was that most company heads believed that their employees were part of their family and they did everything they could to keep them when their companies were having a bad year. And likewise, their employees felt the same way. If there were employees who didn’t “fit” within the company, the loyal workers were the spearheads in getting them off the payroll. Team work eases the stress of work. Everyone has a bad day, but if there are chronic bad days, there is something wrong. I remember one of my college instructors telling us, “Don’t look for a job, but rather look to yourselves for your vocation.” When we have a love for what we do, it’s really not a job, it’s a vocation.