Six Hands and One Vision

Six Hands and One VisionAt times it can be exasperating when coming to an agreement on price between buyers and sellers.  On the sellers’ side we sometimes find them deeply entrenched with the idea that their property is special and worth more than similar ones that have sold for less.  We also have to deal with a strong emotional attachment some have to their homes, and that also has an effect at the bargaining table. A Realtor who’s been long since retired used to always ask multiple irrelevant questions about my buyers when I would have an offer. That agent couldn’t “get it” that beyond the ability to purchase, everything else is simply being overly curious in a dark way.  And lastly, we have the relatives and friends who’ve likely never done a real home evaluation in their lives telling their friends and relatives what they “know” their homes are worth.  With all these variables working against an agent, there are sometimes side-tracked sales.  With this type of mindset of sellers, the first good offer is normally the worst offer in their eyes.  It really is unfortunate that these situations take place, but it’s a reality that must be dealt with.  Several years ago I was called out to list the home of some people whom I’d crossed paths with over the years.  Never realizing what a hothead the husband was, I found myself making soulful suggestions to him and his cowering wife about what needed to be done with their home to make it more marketable.  As I was just finishing up on my walk-thru inspection and giving the last of my helpful advise on presentation, the husband blew up at me about my “demands” of change in their home.  After about two minutes of listening to him bashing me, I simply closed my briefcase, got up and said, “It appears we’re not going to be able to work together.” and walked out with him following me outside and being overly apologetic for being so rude.  I walked to my car, got in, drove off, and never looked back.  If I had forgiven him for his outburst and continued on with the listing, I would have known fully that the listing started out bad, and most likely would have ended even worse.  I can only imagine what went on over the years in that household behind closed doors and draped windows.  Too many marriages are based on one person wearing down the other to the point of near complete control.  Likely in that relationship, the control was born out of fear.

I had a recent closing of a home to a young buyer whom I believe is a true mover and shaker.  For being slight of build, she’s not afraid of work.  She and her husband to be have been an absolute delight to work with simply because of their ability to see past multiple fix-up jobs necessary to make a home pleasant.  I was a bit worried about them not having the knowledge to complete those tasks, so I asked her if she would please have her parents look at it before they purchased it.  One Saturday morning I spent nearly two hours going through the home with her father.  I was quickly brought up to speed with his knowledge of home construction and repairs.  I made sure to point out every flaw to him so that he would be up to speed with the amount of work needed.  After his inspection, I was delightfully surprised he knew what he was talking about.  He actually knew the quality/grade of the siding that was on the home.  After listening to him quietly speaking of his accomplishments in the construction industry, I teasingly said to him, “I wish I could clone you and spread you around Mason City because I think you’d give many a run for their money.”

He gave his daughter his blessing on purchasing the home and told me he would be helping her as much as his time allowed.  You couldn’t ask for more when you’ve got six hands and one vision, and I’ll remain confident their new home in the near future will be a rubberneck drive-by.  How about if we clone all three of them?