Everybody Needs a Friend

dogOf all the continued studies of the interaction of humans with animals, it never ceases to amaze me the effects of animals on humans as well as humans on animals. When I was growing up on the farm and surrounded by numerous animals, there seemed for me at such an early age, a feeling of community. There were different ideas, different needs and wants, and certainly different personalities. Each day that passed, there were lessons learned. Being awakened in the middle of the night to go out into the barn and help a milk cow giving birth breech, creeping into the chicken house that seemed at the time like a cathedral to help catch chickens that would be crated and on their way to the market early the next morning, and the oink of curious little piggies always wanting attention. The dogs and cats all had their little personality quirks. Some loved chasing cars, others only had their favorite humans whom they would allow petting, and lastly the trouble makers.

In suburbia, this pattern of personalities continues. For me, I believe that dogs and cats mirror their masters. I have a client who always seems aloof. Her cat acts similarly. Naughty dogs seem to be owned by naughty masters; outgoing dogs and cats seem to have masters who have like traits.

I’m sure anyone who has a pet and considers it part of the family knows that there exists a selflessness that flows from the pet to the master. Numerous times I have heard stories about how a person’s pet seems to “know” if they are having a good day or a bad day. Maybe they’re psychic. Whatever is going on between pets and their masters, I am convinced that everyone needs a friend that accepts them for all their faults and virtues. Animals have learned the real meaning of selfless love.