A Watched Pot Never Boils

clockHave you ever really noticed how time changes speed?  Waiting for stop lights that seem an eternity, a waiting room at a dentist’s office, even the insignificant things like waiting for a message to be played back on a cell phone.  Yet how many times do we find how quickly time passes when we are in the midst of reading some very interesting book, walking on a beach, or even spending time with some delightful person?  I used to find time to be the slowest when I was at a property waiting for customers to arrive and they were more than ten minutes late.  I’m pretty much “over it” since I learned how to settle down and just go with the flow of the situation.  I laugh to myself whenever people are so apologetic for being late that they go over-board with their sorries.  When at a stop light, I just take time to look at the surroundings; when at the dentist’s office, I just start remembering pleasant places  I have visited; and lastly when waiting for a gadget to respond, I just think about how much faster the humans still are than the machines.  I have a dear friend who is a typist of lightening speed, and every time I have watched him on the computer, his fingers moved faster than the ability of the computer to respond.  A terribly dear and elderly client/customer paid me a memorable compliment last week.  He said, “Joe, you sold our home nearly 25 years ago and here I’m old and you don’t look any older than when you sold our home.”  I smiled and said, “Time is a lie, because we create within our minds how we should look and act for our respective ages.”   I’ll tell you all a secret.  I don’t have a watch or clock within reach or view.  If I really need to know what time it is, I look on my cell phone or computer.  Don’t we all need to back away from the stove; waiting for a pot to boil?  It all happens sooner…or later.